Archive for the ‘monochromes’ Category

Purple blush

November 29, 2012

If  the ocean is blue because it reflects the sky, why is the sky blue if the space is dark? Can we still trust colours? Certainly not when shooting with a tungsten film. Under sunlight (warm color temperatures) light conditions, tungsten films will produce a  bold purple or pink tint.

The water is chilly in Portugal, but the surf’s up! Coxos wasn’t firing, but I had perfect sessions in Ribeira d’Ilhas and Arrifana. A boa vida, não e?

Banana village

March 29, 2012

Redscale photography needs a lot of light. If you’re using a SLR cam you’ll have an exposure meter plus full access to shutter speed, aperture and ISO controls. You can nearly find an infinity of combinations for the desired exposure. Piece o’ cake.

However, lomo or toy cams often do not provide as much control. My Sprocket Rocket has only two apertures and one fixed shutter speed at 1/100 s (there is also the bulb mode, but no ISO control and no exposure meter at all). That leaves only a few combinations, so it’s harder to find a good exposure… To compensate the lack of ISO control, you can set it up to the biggest aperture (even on a sunny day), and try to include a source of light at an edge of the picture (beware of flare). If it’s still too dark, switch to the bulb mode (don’t forget your pocket tripod!). It’s a bit easier with the Holga because it can open to f/8, versus f/10.8 for the Sprocket Rocket. Just practice!

Taghazout redscale

March 22, 2012

A warmed stroll from Anchor Point to Taghazout heights.

In redscale photography the film is loaded backwards. The light has to pierce through the back of the film (the red layer), which is now on top.  The blue layer, consequently in the bottom, is left unexposed. The result is a dramatic color shift, with warm red, orange and yellow tints, depending on the exposure.

An under exposed redscale film will be dark with intense red and orange tones, while an over exposed one will be golden, with sparkling orange and yellow tones (sometimes you can also get greens and blues, but you will need a lot of light in order to pierce the thick filter). But there’s also a trick to find a correct exposure: always over expose it, from 1 to 3 stops!

Hysteric ball

November 28, 2011

A freaky version of the beach ball, and also the only ball game in the world without any rules or purpose.

Gather a bunch of over-enthusiastic Chinese people around a ball. As the ball-carrier shoots it up in the air, the catchers will start running and yelling in all directions; not always towards the ball. If you’re lucky enough to catch it, you will be surrounded silently until you shoot it up for another round.

They played that for 4 hours straight.

Beach bum

October 23, 2011

You can also escape from central Hong-Kong madness by going to the other side of the island. Hit Shek’O beach or Big Wave bay. Don’t bring your surfboard though, for this is just a marketing name. The bus road is very cool, snaking trough the hills, up and down to the beach.

I used an ISO 64 (tungsten white balance) expired film. Expired films can give surprising results and a slight pink tint. But combined with the ISO 64, usually enhancing blue tones, the pics got a full pink tint. There’s a french song saying “Je vois la vie en rose”.

Bluescale

October 2, 2011

Still on the same journey, accross Lantau with my Holga.  This time I loaded an ISO 100 Provia film. According to your film, if you under or over expose it you can achieve different color tones.

Bluescale yes, but … in greens!

Redscale

September 13, 2011

Lantau island has a totally different feel from its crowded neighbour Hong-Kong.

Ingredients: a red scale film and a Holga. Set it up on ‘sunny days’ aperture (f/11) to under-expose the clichés and enhance the red tint.

Monochromes

November 19, 2009

… but not only b&whites!